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How to Dye Plastic/Vinyl Bike Parts

#1 2007-03-10 3:41am

Crusty Old Bloke
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How to Dye Plastic/Vinyl Bike Parts

Original thread with pics and other information can be found here:  http://www.bmxmuseum.com/forums/viewtopic.php?id=9891 



Yes.  I've done it.  I scored 4 NOS seats off the bay - black, blue, yellow and... orange.  Damn, I thought it was red and guess what, I really needed a red one.  No problem, experiment with dyeing.

You'll need:

1. A pot bit enough to hang the seat (and pedals) into without them touching the sides of the pot.

2. Something to hang them from, such as a wire coat hanger, zip ties, etc.

3. About 1 lb of salt (500g for those enlightened folks who use the metric system)

4. Dye.

5. A siz pack of good beer.

For the latter, I used Dylon No.9 Pagoda Red, but you'll obviusly use some form of purple.  I used one of the dye buttons, you may need to use 2 to go from white to purple depending on how dark you wish to go.  Remember, I was going from a puke guava type orange to red, so not a big stretch.

Get the pot full of water, and get it simmering.  Stir in the salt to get it disolved into the water.  Get a cup of boiling water, and add the dye button(s) to it - the dye is in a powder form.  Pour that into the pot and immerse the stuff you want to dye.

Start work on the beer.

Oh, take off the brand new bone coloured dress pants your grandmother bought you for Christmas, just in case you splash yourself.  Not with the beer, but with the dye.  Actually, don't splash yourself with the beer, that's a waste.

Keep it simmering away.  Keep an eye on progress to make sure it isn't getting too dark, but this will take time.  I saw no result for about an hour.

After about an hour, take the stuff out and rinse it off, then re-immerse it, taking it out every 15 minutes for a rinse.  Once you're happy with the colour, give it a good rinse and let it dry.  You're good to go... well, once you get the colour out of the wife's (or in my case - mother-in-law's) cooking pot.  It will come out, but might take some elbow grease.  Any left over beer will help here too.  Not for scrubbing - for numbing the boredom.

I'm not sure what dye you have in the Fenway craft shops, but you need something that will dye nylon and plastics.  If you have Dylon, then I recommend it, but I know folks who have had good luck with Rit, but I don't know if you have that in the USA either.

Hope that helps, good luck.

Oh, the seat went red, I pulled it out when it was the shade I wanted - job well done!

Crusty
- ohmigawd, I was helpful for once!

Last edited by Hellmutt (2008-02-16 3:51pm)


Is it against the laws of God and the state to marry a Redline?

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#2 2008-08-08 8:36pm

xeokym
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Re: How to Dye Plastic/Vinyl Bike Parts

I'm still trying to find out if it's possible to dye white tires. At the local Walfart, they sell white 20" comp III-style tires at all times, and because of that I thought, wouldn't it be neat if I could buy brand new white BMX tires and be able to dye them any color I needed?

Well I've tried several different dye brands, including RIT and this "industrial-strength" stuff that claimed to be permanent, and I have had absolutely NO luck dying tires whatsoever. I soaked a white 20x2.125 for 2 days in some turquoise dye in a half-full 5 gallon bucket, and it dyed EVERYTHING (bucket included) BUT the tires. They washed off completely white! sad Has anyone successfully dyed tires? Can it be done, or is there some kinda coating ON the tire that sorta prevents it from dying? Is there some kind of dye more powerful than just what can be bought at the local supermarket/craft store that works better than what I've been using?


§~MY RIDES~§ 08 SE retro repro black 20" PK Ripper, 08 SE retro repro tan 20" Quadangle, 00 Haro Shredder, 99 Haro Master 2010 SE retro repro 20" gold PK Ripper, and hopefully soon 26" SE/DC yellow 26" Quadangle.

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#3 2008-08-24 11:31pm

Topvillain
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Re: How to Dye Plastic/Vinyl Bike Parts

I need to know if its possible to dye tires with something as well.


Member blkout619 buys stolen bikes.
http://bmxmuseum.com/forums/viewtopic.php?id=82401

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#4 2008-08-25 6:39pm

Crusty Old Bloke
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Re: How to Dye Plastic/Vinyl Bike Parts

The above works with nylon based plastics, so it won't work on rubber.

Rubber is actually a clear substance.  It's made black by the addition of carbon, and similarly, it's made coloured by the addition of various pigments in the factory.

Maybe try a google search for "dying rubber" or "rubber dye" or similar.  Short answer is I don't know of anyone who has successfully dyed tyres.

I think you could try tyre black to convert a coloured tyre to black (which might take several attempts) but not from say, whiite to red or lavender or magenta or metallic turquoise.

I'd like to say "hope that helps" but I know it doesn't.  Sorry!

Crusty


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#5 2008-09-07 5:21am

Rex
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Re: How to Dye Plastic/Vinyl Bike Parts

can you dye wheels?????????????????

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#6 2008-09-07 8:22pm

Crusty Old Bloke
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Re: How to Dye Plastic/Vinyl Bike Parts

Tuffs?  Yep.  There's likely to be a thread on ehre somewhere about that.

Crusty


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#7 2008-09-07 8:57pm

woftam master
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Re: How to Dye Plastic/Vinyl Bike Parts

There is absolutely no way of dyeing rubber. Tyres are predominantly black due to carbon black being the key ingredient that determines the hardness of the rubber. Tyre manufacturers would love to get away from black cos it causes heat build up, the biggest cause of tyres going bang.
There are other substitutes to give coloured tyres but they are either expensive or useless when it comes to wear rates. The colour of the tyre is an integral part of the compound, and once the compound is cured there is no dye that will penetrate without adversely affecting the rubber. The only dyes that will penetrate are oil based, and oil will dissolve both natural and synthetic rubber.
If you want to protect the colour of your tyres and keep them fresh give em a coat of shellack. It will prevent uv breakdown of both the rubber and prevent fading.
hehe me gettin tec nee cal (I work at a rubber / tyre retreading factory)

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