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Seat Repair

#1 2021-04-12 7:35am

EarlyDurban
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Seat Repair

https://s3.amazonaws.com/uploads.bmxmuseum.com/user-images/265970/55343667-5ee3-4658-8edd-61b6ff3773d560745a4221.jpeg

Anyone have any suggestions? Bought it on here last night.....have a couple ideas but I’d love to hear other members opinions who might have experience fixing something like this....


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#2 2021-04-12 11:26am

HempKnight
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Re: Seat Repair

Some good quality clear epoxy should do the job, maybe with an extra plastic piece to overlap on the inside to give more surface area/to hold in place.

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#3 2021-04-12 11:53am

blue78
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Re: Seat Repair

I don't know much on the subject, so it would warrant more research, but maybe if the material is a thermoplastic, a good repair would be carried out by plastic welding (?).

And I was always under the assumption that some plastics become prone to cracking as they age and there's really no way to rejuvenate them. Is that true for old-school seats?

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#4 2021-04-12 12:37pm

EarlyDurban
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Re: Seat Repair

blue78 wrote:

I don't know much on the subject, so it would warrant more research, but maybe if the material is a thermoplastic, a good repair would be carried out by plastic welding (?).

And I was always under the assumption that some plastics become prone to cracking as they age and there's really no way to rejuvenate them. Is that true for old-school seats?

Good question....I’ve done a bit of looking into plastic welding and the epoxy route as well today. The two step JB weld looks easy. Hoping to hear from someone who’s tried this. I want it structurally sound (even though I won’t be sitting on it), but would like to hide the repair as much as possible at least on the outside of the seat.


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#5 2021-04-14 6:19pm

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Re: Seat Repair

Get the piece fitting tight and melt it in from the back with a soldering iron.  If you mess with the front side the grain will be messed up,  better to show the crack on the front.

Ive used the same method on car interior panels.


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#6 2021-04-14 7:26pm

MAIDEN GT fan
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Re: Seat Repair

Indyjps wrote:

Get the piece fitting tight and melt it in from the back with a soldering iron.  If you mess with the front side the grain will be messed up,  better to show the crack on the front.

Ive used the same method on car interior panels.

This/\/\/\/\ Is What Popped Into My Head As A Fix.


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#7 2021-04-15 4:23am

EarlyDurban
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Re: Seat Repair

Indyjps wrote:

Get the piece fitting tight and melt it in from the back with a soldering iron.  If you mess with the front side the grain will be messed up,  better to show the crack on the front.

Ive used the same method on car interior panels.

There has to be a way to repair and completely conceal the crack.....I just have to find it neutral


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#8 2021-04-15 6:27am

MAIDEN GT fan
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Re: Seat Repair

The Process You Seek May Use Some Sort Of Solvent For Plastics. It's A Form Of Adhesive(Like PVC Bonding) That Allows The Plastic To Soften And Bond Into Itself(Melt). Thus A Seamless Repair!

Last edited by MAIDEN GT fan (2021-04-15 9:53am)


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#9 2021-04-15 7:50am

Stomper
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Re: Seat Repair

MAIDEN GT fan wrote:

Indyjps wrote:

Get the piece fitting tight and melt it in from the back with a soldering iron.  If you mess with the front side the grain will be messed up,  better to show the crack on the front.

Ive used the same method on car interior panels.

This/\/\/\/\ Is What Popped Into My Head As A Fix.

Same


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#10 2021-04-15 9:47am

Newer England
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Re: Seat Repair

Look underneath the seat for the date stamp, as you might find the material noted there also. Knowing the material can help you find optimal repair.

For example, "similar" Kashimax seats from the early 80s were stamped "Nylon" on the bottom and advertised as "pure nylon 6" in BMX Plus! magazine.

This chart can also help you identify plastics:

https://www.partec.qld.edu.au/files/Plastics_Identification_Flow_Chart.pdf

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#11 2021-04-15 11:20am

domwon650
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Re: Seat Repair

I seen this a while back. Not sure if it could be applied but might be an option.

https://vm.tiktok.com/ZMeu3xJMo/

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#12 2021-04-16 8:09am

EarlyDurban
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Re: Seat Repair

Newer England wrote:

Look underneath the seat for the date stamp, as you might find the material noted there also. Knowing the material can help you find optimal repair.

For example, "similar" Kashimax seats from the early 80s were stamped "Nylon" on the bottom and advertised as "pure nylon 6" in BMX Plus! magazine.

This chart can also help you identify plastics:

https://www.partec.qld.edu.au/files/Pla … _Chart.pdf

This one is nylon....1980


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#13 2021-04-16 8:12am

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Re: Seat Repair

I’ve kinda “welded” it back on with a soldering iron from underneath. It’s a bit uneven though so now I’m looking into plastic polishing and trying to re texture the tiny bit on top that is textured. I just couldn’t get the piece to fit back in perfectly. Tried sanding the inside edges with 300 grit but I feel like that didn’t help much....


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#14 2021-04-16 10:20am

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Re: Seat Repair

Most Guys 'Re-Texture' By Blasting With Coarse Sand-Results In A Harsh Finish(Texture). Haven't Done It Yet...But Have A Couple Seats That Need It! smile


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#15 2021-04-16 11:10am

EarlyDurban
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Re: Seat Repair

MAIDEN GT fan wrote:

Most Guys 'Re-Texture' By Blasting With Coarse Sand-Results In A Harsh Finish(Texture). Haven't Done It Yet...But Have A Couple Seats That Need It! smile

Yeah not sure it’s worth it to me to buy the whole sandblasting setup although this does give me a good excuse to buy one big_smile. If anyone has experience doing this type of thing and wants to give it a go, send me a PM. I’ll make it worth your time.


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#16 2021-04-16 7:08pm

Minx20
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Re: Seat Repair

You have a glue gun? Cheap purchase if not.

Get you some hot glue sticks that match and your set.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/uploads.bmxmuseum.com/user-images/28501/20210416_220653607a430bbe.jpg

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#17 2021-04-16 8:18pm

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Re: Seat Repair

This Is What I'm Thinking:https://s3.amazonaws.com/uploads.bmxmuseum.com/user-images/245204/51plfkgvrnl._ac_sl1000_607a535ed4.jpg
Doesn't Have To Be Too Advanced. wink


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#18 2021-04-17 8:07am

EarlyDurban
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Re: Seat Repair

MAIDEN GT fan wrote:

This Is What I'm Thinking:https://s3.amazonaws.com/uploads.bmxmuseum.com/user-image … 535ed4.jpg
Doesn't Have To Be Too Advanced. wink

I’ve haven’t used one since Sophomore year shop class, is a blasting box necessary for media blasting?


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#19 2021-04-17 8:13am

MAIDEN GT fan
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Re: Seat Repair

EarlyDurban wrote:

MAIDEN GT fan wrote:

This Is What I'm Thinking:https://s3.amazonaws.com/uploads.bmxmuseum.com/user-image … 535ed4.jpg
Doesn't Have To Be Too Advanced. wink

I’ve haven’t used one since Sophomore year shop class, is a blasting box necessary for media blasting?

Depends How Much Media/Sand You Want To Save/Re-use. Just Cut Open A Cardboard Box To Blast Into(And Capture Stuff Blasting) Or Just Blast On A Tarp And Fold It Up And Toss It. Of Course Using Safety Glasses And Thick Gloves Would Be Advised.


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#20 2021-04-17 8:21am

butlerglc
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Re: Seat Repair

EarlyDurban wrote:

MAIDEN GT fan wrote:

This Is What I'm Thinking:https://s3.amazonaws.com/uploads.bmxmuseum.com/user-image … 535ed4.jpg
Doesn't Have To Be Too Advanced. wink

I’ve haven’t used one since Sophomore year shop class, is a blasting box necessary for media blasting?

You can just do it over a wheel narrow  so it catches some of your blasting material and it can be reused.
But make sure to have proper breathing protection and face and eye protection.
You also need a high capacity air compressor too.
Harbor freight sells a good open sand blast kit.
https://www.harborfreight.com/portable- … NAQAvD_BwE


No more media blasting at this time.
I am always glad to give advice any time!!!

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#21 2021-04-17 10:39am

Deimos666
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Re: Seat Repair

Last few plastic items I repaired I used JB Plastic Bonder with mesh drywall tape in the middle to add some reinforcement across the crack. One was a refrigerator pull out drawer that was split in the front middle from top to bottom and could hardly open because of this (was like a 10" split), been holding fine for a couple months and it sees stress every time it is open / closed (looks ugly but that wasn't a concern, its a clear drawer so not much you can do to hide it).

With the seat, there of course might be a thin seam depending how tightly fit it can be, but likely wouldn’t notice from a distance and not many options to not have that possibility.

I also used the Plastic Bonder on my old car key remote fob that was all busted up, held for a few years no problem until it stopped working electrically. I seemed that the Plastic Bonder was less brittle than the regular JB Weld. Don't skip on roughing up the surface where the epoxy will be or it may not stick. I usually use rough sandpaper and go as far as using a razor blade to make cut lines in every direction possible to make it real rough where the epoxy will touch, maybe overkill but has worked.

I think if this were done on the inside it would hold fine for your purpose and look okay still on the outside. I would probably use super glue and baking soda to "tack" that piece back in with a couple small drops so it stays put while the epoxy cures, but you must be very careful or you'll make a mess / trash it with super glue running everywhere.

I've done the soldering method as well over the years, one thing I noticed is some plastics seem extra brittle once remelted back together, but it can certainly work too. I don't mind the epoxy first as I can slowly grind it off if I want to try something else, not fun though.

I wasn't going to post in this thread once you said you were looking for a way to completely conceal the crack, which I don't think is practical, but figured I'd add my 2 cents worth of post.

Keep us posted with what route you go and how it holds up for future reference.

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#22 2021-04-17 12:14pm

EarlyDurban
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Re: Seat Repair

Deimos666 wrote:

Last few plastic items I repaired I used JB Plastic Bonder with mesh drywall tape in the middle to add some reinforcement across the crack. One was a refrigerator pull out drawer that was split in the front middle from top to bottom and could hardly open because of this (was like a 10" split), been holding fine for a couple months and it sees stress every time it is open / closed (looks ugly but that wasn't a concern, its a clear drawer so not much you can do to hide it).

With the seat, there of course might be a thin seam depending how tightly fit it can be, but likely wouldn’t notice from a distance and not many options to not have that possibility.

I also used the Plastic Bonder on my old car key remote fob that was all busted up, held for a few years no problem until it stopped working electrically. I seemed that the Plastic Bonder was less brittle than the regular JB Weld. Don't skip on roughing up the surface where the epoxy will be or it may not stick. I usually use rough sandpaper and go as far as using a razor blade to make cut lines in every direction possible to make it real rough where the epoxy will touch, maybe overkill but has worked.

I think if this were done on the inside it would hold fine for your purpose and look okay still on the outside. I would probably use super glue and baking soda to "tack" that piece back in with a couple small drops so it stays put while the epoxy cures, but you must be very careful or you'll make a mess / trash it with super glue running everywhere.

I've done the soldering method as well over the years, one thing I noticed is some plastics seem extra brittle once remelted back together, but it can certainly work too. I don't mind the epoxy first as I can slowly grind it off if I want to try something else, not fun though.

I wasn't going to post in this thread once you said you were looking for a way to completely conceal the crack, which I don't think is practical, but figured I'd add my 2 cents worth of post.

Keep us posted with what route you go and how it holds up for future reference.

I tried the double tube JB plastic bond crap first and it just didn’t hold. Idk if maybe it’s because it’s nylon or what. The way I have it fixed now isn’t too terrible....definitely not noticeable from a distance, but I’d love to kind of smooth it out. Bad thing is the small piece that was broken off has just a sliver of the textured part on it so I’m dealing with two different surfaces.


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#23 2021-04-17 12:16pm

EarlyDurban
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Re: Seat Repair

....also I appreciate all the advice and replies, that’s why I love this site


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#24 2021-04-17 1:29pm

Hawked
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Re: Seat Repair

You could make it a "5 footer" but any close look will clearly see the repair. It really depends on what you are going for with your build to try a repair, or find a new one.

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#25 2021-04-18 5:49pm

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Re: Seat Repair

https://www.harborfreight.com/21-oz-hop … YtEALw_wcB

These little blasters work good for short duration.   any blasting the media has to be very dry.


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