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Advice on Flatland bikes to an oldskool noob?  RSS Feed

#26 2010-04-16 5:56am

aswtx75
Museum Newbie
Registered: 2010-01-27
Posts: 18

Re: Advice on Flatland bikes to an oldskool noob?

lowrider wrote:

im just getting back on a bike after finding this website a week ago... been working on the 88 performer but these new bikes are totally foreign to me. its gonna take a while to get back into it but im gonna mark this thread for future reference... thanks for all the info posted. smile

Sweet man good luck. You might wanna check out global-flat.com also. They're going to start the video competitions in about a week and you can enter and compete for prizes if you want. Should be fun. Unfortunately I banged my knee real bad and haven't been able to ride for over a week but I think I'll be all healed up and ready once it starts. Bikes taken quite some time to get used to. When I was a kid the bikes I rode were about half my weight; this bike is about a tenth of my weight, seriously. Though I've learned some stuff on it I never thought I could do like Whiplashes and brakeless firehydrants. Been having a blast. Good luck.

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#27 2010-04-17 8:15pm

lowrider
Pro MemberRiding On My 20
From: NorCal to North Texas
Registered: 2010-04-06
Posts: 3786
Bikes: 29
For Sale: 7

Re: Advice on Flatland bikes to an oldskool noob?

aswtx75 wrote:

lowrider wrote:

im just getting back on a bike after finding this website a week ago... been working on the 88 performer but these new bikes are totally foreign to me. its gonna take a while to get back into it but im gonna mark this thread for future reference... thanks for all the info posted. smile

Sweet man good luck. You might wanna check out global-flat.com also. They're going to start the video competitions in about a week and you can enter and compete for prizes if you want. Should be fun. Unfortunately I banged my knee real bad and haven't been able to ride for over a week but I think I'll be all healed up and ready once it starts. Bikes taken quite some time to get used to. When I was a kid the bikes I rode were about half my weight; this bike is about a tenth of my weight, seriously. Though I've learned some stuff on it I never thought I could do like Whiplashes and brakeless firehydrants. Been having a blast. Good luck.

thanks bro, i just came home from a ride with a banged up shin and a bloody finger but it was fun tongue had to try out my new front brakes and pegs i picked up today. big_smile

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#28 2010-04-18 9:48pm

Paul Hahn
Intermediate
From: Highland, IN
Registered: 2007-11-12
Posts: 261
Bikes: 12

Re: Advice on Flatland bikes to an oldskool noob?

Welcome back lowrider,  bloody shins from here on out!

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#29 2010-04-23 5:46pm

brian84corvette
Expert
From: Ft Lauterdale, FL
Registered: 2008-11-01
Posts: 848
Bikes: 9

Re: Advice on Flatland bikes to an oldskool noob?

brian84corvette is a dedicated flatlander.

here is my video
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TvfmfzDBx_Y
I was riding this bike here in that video I filmed ^
http://i214.photobucket.com/albums/cc279/brian84corvette/PICT0009-7.jpg
but I have retired that bike since and have moved on to a better suited to me bike.



I currently have about 5 diffrent flatland completes setup - and have put together over 20 diffrent bikes in my flatland time of 3 or 4 years now.

I find that a bike with top tube of 19+ inches but not more than 20.25 inches is ideal.
rear chain stay measure of 13 to 13.5  is ideal
160 mm crank arms are long enough for some torque - but short enough to not be in the way
tires have to have 120 psi in them.   no exeptions    YES I SWEAR !  I can not ride with less than 120 psi.  it feels like im riding on flat tires if its lower than 100 psi.
odyssey makes the frequency g tire in black wall and also tan wall.  its basicly the best tire for the $

I personaly use 0 degree offset forks so my front axle is in the same spot wether my bars are fowards or backwards -  this is good so that I dont have to learn the diffrent feelings of the offset on the fork for all of my tricks.    its all the same.
I also use 0 degree backsweep on my handlebars for this reason.
alot of tricks for flatland will require you to have your bars backwards - and to me having sweep feels un conftorble when the bars are backwards since its at like a negative fowards angle.

I shop at flatlandfuel.com
love them over places like albes or dans.   the fuel is flatland rider owned and operated  and they are good people over there.       

things to stay away from when buying a new school flatland bike :
frames that seem so light weight its un real =   the answer is they are not real.   real in the aspect of being able to withstand the stress of riding the bike.   some new fangled flatland frames can only handle the stress of light riding - and have a parts life span on them - meaning that after the part has been used to its yeild strength  its done.       

my video I was riding a khe parris 2 frame = un godly light weight.
and it would simply snap in half if I ever tried to bunnyhop down a 3 stair with it.
its sole purpose is low stress flatland tricks only - and thats all i will ever do with it.
I still have my parris 1 frame also - but realize that they can only do so much with out catsastrophic failure.      frames like the hoffman strowler are much more suited for crossbreed riding  and can handle a bit more stress ( or weight of the rider )  with out any problems - its built sturdy and should last a lifetime.

dont buy in to the gimics.   light weight is ok to a certan point - but dont expect your 19lb bike to hold up forever with out failure of some sort.

my daily ride is a little on the long side but I like it enough to make due.
its a S&M laf frame 20.75" top tube
odyssey 0 offset forks
suelo 35mm reach stem
sickchild metal years handlebars 8" rise - 0 back sweep
khe wana b seat with rails - love it
thompson seat post
blue ukai 36 spoke wheel set 4x to taska u free freecoaster hub with 9 tooth driver / bulemia f hub
tan wall 1.75 frequency g tires at 120+ psi
suelo 160 mm crank set with 24 tooth sprocket / haro plastic smallblock pedals
and I use sequence griptape aluminum pegs on all 4 corners.

my bike is totaly strong.  I ride miniramp and skatepark with it when I feel like it.
and its totaly flatland capable - exept the top tube is about .75" on the long side
but its still amazing to ride  and I can do everything on the bike
including riding no handed for miles even with 0 offset forks on it.

http://i214.photobucket.com/albums/cc279/brian84corvette/PICT0004-7.jpg
the wheel set is diffrent on the bike now  as they are blue ukai old school rims laced to new school hubs.


Bass adicted - car stereo crazy - flatlanding any bike with pegs
hittin switches in the old school low low goin down the block
rollin on Dz  and blastin my musics

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#30 2010-04-24 11:38pm

brian84corvette
Expert
From: Ft Lauterdale, FL
Registered: 2008-11-01
Posts: 848
Bikes: 9

Re: Advice on Flatland bikes to an oldskool noob?

I just found this video.
this rider is verry new school - but has retained some of the old school flavor as well.
its kind of rare now adays to see a mixture that blends so well of new and old.
verry inspiring to me to say the least.

http://vimeo.com/7462344

I realley loved watching this video ^
and highly recomend it to everyone to watch !

Last edited by brian84corvette (2010-04-24 11:39pm)


Bass adicted - car stereo crazy - flatlanding any bike with pegs
hittin switches in the old school low low goin down the block
rollin on Dz  and blastin my musics

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#31 2010-04-25 5:51am

aswtx75
Museum Newbie
Registered: 2010-01-27
Posts: 18

Re: Advice on Flatland bikes to an oldskool noob?

brian84corvette wrote:

I just found this video.
this rider is verry new school - but has retained some of the old school flavor as well.
its kind of rare now adays to see a mixture that blends so well of new and old.
verry inspiring to me to say the least.

http://vimeo.com/7462344

I realley loved watching this video ^
and highly recomend it to everyone to watch !

Thanks that was awesome. Your riding to. I practice a lot of peg wheelies so I can really appreciate how good you are at those. Did it take you long to get good at the half-lash? I've done it a few times the last few days but it's still hard as hell.

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#32 2010-04-25 12:10pm

brian84corvette
Expert
From: Ft Lauterdale, FL
Registered: 2008-11-01
Posts: 848
Bikes: 9

Re: Advice on Flatland bikes to an oldskool noob?

there is a funny little trick you will learn with the steering of the bike.   almost like a turn outwards and then cut back inwards real quick as the half lash starts and it will help "whip"  the back end of the bike around.

I find half lash to be eaziest when going from front peg and rear peg.
not off the pedal.
pedals always move around on you and change the force needed for a trick at diffrent pedal positions so its hard to dial in off them.


Bass adicted - car stereo crazy - flatlanding any bike with pegs
hittin switches in the old school low low goin down the block
rollin on Dz  and blastin my musics

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#33 2010-04-25 12:33pm

aswtx75
Museum Newbie
Registered: 2010-01-27
Posts: 18

Re: Advice on Flatland bikes to an oldskool noob?

brian84corvette wrote:

there is a funny little trick you will learn with the steering of the bike.   almost like a turn outwards and then cut back inwards real quick as the half lash starts and it will help "whip"  the back end of the bike around.

I find half lash to be eaziest when going from front peg and rear peg.
not off the pedal.
pedals always move around on you and change the force needed for a trick at diffrent pedal positions so its hard to dial in off them.

Cool. I'll mess with those details. Today I did a lot better with it. It feels like it's starting to come together. I did this thing where from the half lash you kick the tire around and then kind of ride it around till the back wheel ends up behind you again and you land back on the bike. Couldn't believe I pulled it off. Probably take another 200 tries to do it again but at least I got it on tape. Made my day cuz the last two days have been brutal. Thanks for the tips.

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#34 2010-04-25 12:44pm

aswtx75
Museum Newbie
Registered: 2010-01-27
Posts: 18

Re: Advice on Flatland bikes to an oldskool noob?

I like your handlebars. I tried to get some of those but couldn't find any. Went with st.martin eien bars with a precision stem. I like it so far but my grips absolutely suck when my hands sweat. odyssey thumb tack grips. What grips do you use?

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#35 2010-04-25 6:32pm

brian84corvette
Expert
From: Ft Lauterdale, FL
Registered: 2008-11-01
Posts: 848
Bikes: 9

Re: Advice on Flatland bikes to an oldskool noob?

http://www.flatlandfuel.com/index.asp?P … rodID=1392

they are a bit hard at first - but its cool because they will last a while.
I dont use a brake lever - so I just cut mine in half on those chase bars on the top bike
and run them down past the bends.


Bass adicted - car stereo crazy - flatlanding any bike with pegs
hittin switches in the old school low low goin down the block
rollin on Dz  and blastin my musics

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#36 2010-06-19 4:46am

aswtx75
Museum Newbie
Registered: 2010-01-27
Posts: 18

Re: Advice on Flatland bikes to an oldskool noob?

Finally started doing hang 5's.  Working a lot on halfhikers also.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vpAJ74cJnho

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#37 2010-06-19 5:20am

jimib
Museum Addict
From: Asheville, NC
Registered: 2008-06-21
Posts: 1826
Bikes: 16
Website

Re: Advice on Flatland bikes to an oldskool noob?

sweet video. cool to see the progression. I have just recently got back in and have purchased a new school flatland. It seems so small and I have not had a chance to get used to it. Did you just start practicing the peg wheelies or did you have some tips before you started. What's your biggest piece of advice at this point in your learning flat land. The bike I got has 0 offset forks and no stem. It has the bars that are straight up and attach directly to the fork. I am beginning to think it would be better to have a stem to give it a little more room and some offset.

Here's a pic of my flatland
[img][/img]http://i717.photobucket.com/albums/ww179/blt_bucket/100_2504.jpg


"Time is a great teacher, unfortunately it kills all it's pupils"
"BMX Mausoleum, where old bikes go to die and have their picture taken" Hector Dangus

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#38 2010-06-19 7:06am

brian84corvette
Expert
From: Ft Lauterdale, FL
Registered: 2008-11-01
Posts: 848
Bikes: 9

Re: Advice on Flatland bikes to an oldskool noob?

that is the khe militant lt
and its a super good frame.   verry quick and responsive.
I had one for a bit.

as for the offset of the bars -
I only wish I could of got used to riding true 0 offset.
it feels weird somehow.    -  I mean I love the 0 offset forks
but not having the bars fowards some feels increadibly alkwards to me.

so if you have the chance - give a stem a try from 26mm to 40mm of fowards reach on the stem.  anything more and you shoudl probly look at a longer frame instead.


Bass adicted - car stereo crazy - flatlanding any bike with pegs
hittin switches in the old school low low goin down the block
rollin on Dz  and blastin my musics

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#39 2010-06-20 12:54pm

aswtx75
Museum Newbie
Registered: 2010-01-27
Posts: 18

Re: Advice on Flatland bikes to an oldskool noob?

jimib wrote:

sweet video. cool to see the progression. I have just recently got back in and have purchased a new school flatland. It seems so small and I have not had a chance to get used to it. Did you just start practicing the peg wheelies or did you have some tips before you started. What's your biggest piece of advice at this point in your learning flat land. The bike I got has 0 offset forks and no stem. It has the bars that are straight up and attach directly to the fork. I am beginning to think it would be better to have a stem to give it a little more room and some offset.

Here's a pic of my flatland
http://i717.photobucket.com/albums/ww17 … 0_2504.jpg

Man that's a nice bike!!!  My bike came with those swissmiss bars and I decided to try a traditional stem and bar and I like the stem better because you can adjust it how you like it BUT I think you can get used to anything just about, if you stick with the bike long enough.  I was VERY uncomfortable on my bike for about two months I'd say. But now it feels very comfortable.

  I guess my biggest piece of advice is just ride as much as you can and as consistently as possible.  Right now I ride 5-6 days a week, 3-4 hrs a day, but of coarse most people have lives so that's not possible lol.  And focus on good basics that are going to lead to more advanced stuff later.  For me it has been: pegwheelies, steamrollers, hang 5 (Not sure I'd personally recommend tackling hang 5's right off the bat, better to wait till you are more comfortable with doing pegwheelies and steamrollers; just my opinion). 
  Pegwheelies was the one trick that kept me riding and kept me from losing my mind.  It's a good safe trick that gets your body used to balancing on one wheel, and realllllly fun when you get good at them.  Right from the start I would ride pegwheelies one way and my left foot and then going back I'd switch to my right foot, because I knew eventually as I advanced I'd be having to balance using my right foot also (my weaker side, for some reason).  I'm doing that also with hang 5's; one way I go on my left foot and then back I try riding on my right foot (really sucking right now).  My goal is to do a halfpacker and to do that I'll have to be used to using both feet in the hang 5 position; I figure if I start getting used to it now it will be a lot easier later.
  I also like watching videos of guys riding who are just a little bit better than me.  Gives me ideas for tricks I can realistically do probably.  You start watching Matthias Dandois videos and you'll want to quit riding as soon as you realize you can't even do the ride-ins to his tricks, lol.
  Today for the first time I did a good halfhiker with a rideout, if you would have told me four months ago that I'd be doing that I'd think you were crazy lol.  I could barely even ride my bike in a straight line lol.  You just gotta stick with it and keep riding and keep getting up and trying again.  Worked for me pretty good so far.
   Keeps me motivated also -- http://www.global-flat.com/smf/

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#40 2010-06-21 2:29pm

jimib
Museum Addict
From: Asheville, NC
Registered: 2008-06-21
Posts: 1826
Bikes: 16
Website

Re: Advice on Flatland bikes to an oldskool noob?

Thanks for the info and compliments on the KHE guy's.

Here's some issues I have going on with the KHE. First is the free coaster that is on it. I think its a Nankai? I can not get used to the gap when you start to peddle and it engages. I am assuming that is typical of cheaper free coasters. It's just that sometimes when I go to peddle it about throws me off when it takes a quarter turn to engage. Any thoughts? Oh yeah the axle is 3/8 and so is the frame, so any suggestions of new hubs will have to be 3/8 (that seems to be rare?).

Next issue is that if I don't position my feet right and peddle consciously thinking about it, my heels will strike the rear pegs. I have lengthened the chain out as much as possible. Is this normal with these shorter frames. I am only 5'8" and my shoe size is 10 1/2, so I know its not because of my physical size. Oh yeah when I go to whip the bike with my feet on the pedals my toes hit the front wheel as it's turning. Some of that is because I am riding with my feet forward to avoid the rear pegs.

So, are these normal issues? LMK 

oh yeah, Brian I hadn't seen you post in a while, didn't know what happened. I may have even  pm'ed you. Anyway, good to hear from you.

Last edited by jimib (2010-06-21 2:31pm)


"Time is a great teacher, unfortunately it kills all it's pupils"
"BMX Mausoleum, where old bikes go to die and have their picture taken" Hector Dangus

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#41 2010-06-21 2:46pm

aswtx75
Museum Newbie
Registered: 2010-01-27
Posts: 18

Re: Advice on Flatland bikes to an oldskool noob?

There is a way to adjust your freecoaster but I don't know how.  Someone on globalflat.com probably could help you out.  My feet hit the pegs also when I first started and I've heard several ppl complain of the same thing. I'm almost 6ft and my bike is 18.9. Took me a while to get used to it but now my feet rarely hit the pegs and peddling feels very natural. Yesterday I hopped on my road bike that I was riding before I started riding my flatland bike, and man that thing feels gigantic now.  I think a lot of it is just riding and getting used to how the bike feels.

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#42 2010-06-21 4:41pm

brian84corvette
Expert
From: Ft Lauterdale, FL
Registered: 2008-11-01
Posts: 848
Bikes: 9

Re: Advice on Flatland bikes to an oldskool noob?

I had the same problem hitting my heals on the pegs.  it was super annoying.

I switched up to shorter crank arms to help solve this issue.

my favorite crank arm leingth is 160mm   and I run 23/24 front / 9 rear  with them.
I have 152mm crank arms also but run 20/9 gear ratio with them as they are much less torque
also have tried the 145mm crank arms but those were stupid small.   realley retarded actually
so dont bother with those.   145mm crank arms are for people less than 48inches tall.  lol


so are you getting used to those bars yet ?   they look like dragonfly mike s bars /   but sequence also makes the barstem that is completely 0 offset like yours are.


Bass adicted - car stereo crazy - flatlanding any bike with pegs
hittin switches in the old school low low goin down the block
rollin on Dz  and blastin my musics

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#43 2010-06-21 7:03pm

jimib
Museum Addict
From: Asheville, NC
Registered: 2008-06-21
Posts: 1826
Bikes: 16
Website

Re: Advice on Flatland bikes to an oldskool noob?

brian84corvette wrote:

I had the same problem hitting my heals on the pegs.  it was super annoying.

I switched up to shorter crank arms to help solve this issue.

my favorite crank arm leingth is 160mm   and I run 23/24 front / 9 rear  with them.
I have 152mm crank arms also but run 20/9 gear ratio with them as they are much less torque
also have tried the 145mm crank arms but those were stupid small.   realley retarded actually
so dont bother with those.   145mm crank arms are for people less than 48inches tall.  lol


so are you getting used to those bars yet ?   they look like dragonfly mike s bars /   but sequence also makes the barstem that is completely 0 offset like yours are.

My crank arms are 160. Yeah, their Dragon fly Mike S bars and no I'm not used to them yet. They are so awkward feeling, they feel nothing like my old school bikes. lol I am probably going to try a short stem and some bars. I have the stock khe bars and fork, but the steerer tube is not long enough to run the detangler (at this point I need brakes). I noticed flatland fuel doesn't have dragon fly stuff now and the link for their site on global flat is broken. I also saw Mike is no longer riding for them, have they gone out of business? The forks on my bike are dragon fly also, they seem to be really well built. I checked my free coaster is not Nankai it is Taska, which are really cheep. Is there a better 3/8 free coaster that is not an arm and a leg? I doubt the Taska is adjustable.


"Time is a great teacher, unfortunately it kills all it's pupils"
"BMX Mausoleum, where old bikes go to die and have their picture taken" Hector Dangus

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#44 2010-06-22 12:49pm

brian84corvette
Expert
From: Ft Lauterdale, FL
Registered: 2008-11-01
Posts: 848
Bikes: 9

Re: Advice on Flatland bikes to an oldskool noob?

the taska is ajustable by adding a slack washer to it.

the "slack"   basicly works like a coaster brake hub does.   the worm gear inside pulls the cone over to meet up with the internal cone race of the hub to make contact and drive the wheel - so spacing the cone by adding washers of diffrent thicknesses to the hub will shorten the amount of freeplay the thing will have between freecoaster set - and foward pedal engagment.

your gona have to take the hub apart - and take the parts to your local hardware store to see if they have a fiew diffrent thickness washers that will work   mostly trial and error type stuff   but for the cost of the trip to the store and about 2$ in washers you might get it running nicely.
also - you are gona need the correct size cone wrenches for that taska hub.    it needs to be ajusted so the bearings are at the sweet spot.   if its too loose its gona run like poo.  same if its too tight.
but if properly maintained - and well greased up  the taska un sealed freecoaster will last a good long service life.       no real need to go out and spend $$$ on some fancy one to end up not liking that one either.


Bass adicted - car stereo crazy - flatlanding any bike with pegs
hittin switches in the old school low low goin down the block
rollin on Dz  and blastin my musics

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#45 2010-06-22 1:10pm

manida
Pro Member
From: Albuquerque, NM
Registered: 2008-02-04
Posts: 2147
Bikes: 24

Re: Advice on Flatland bikes to an oldskool noob?

anyone got a new-ish flatland bike they wanna sell or trade?  Im getting interested in this new (post-1987) stuff!

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#46 2010-06-22 1:11pm

ANTDOG
Pro MemberSite Advocate!
From: EDISON NJ
Registered: 2006-12-05
Posts: 10608
Bikes: 2
For Sale: 13

Re: Advice on Flatland bikes to an oldskool noob?

I tried riding a mid school bike and a new school bike, could not get the hang, so I switched to my 88 torker with some newer parts. Works for me.


If I Will Throw An Elbow To My Best Friend  In A Turn,what Makes You Think I Wont Do It To You????????????

Former National 29 35-40x  -NBL
2010 2011 Regional #3  NBL

2019 district 174 USABMX

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#47 2010-06-22 1:12pm

aswtx75
Museum Newbie
Registered: 2010-01-27
Posts: 18

Re: Advice on Flatland bikes to an oldskool noob?

manida wrote:

anyone got a new-ish flatland bike they wanna sell or trade?  Im getting interested in this new (post-1987) stuff!

might be able to find something here

http://www.global-flat.com/smf/index.php?board=13.0

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#48 2010-06-22 3:05pm

jimib
Museum Addict
From: Asheville, NC
Registered: 2008-06-21
Posts: 1826
Bikes: 16
Website

Re: Advice on Flatland bikes to an oldskool noob?

brian84corvette wrote:

the taska is ajustable by adding a slack washer to it.

the "slack"   basicly works like a coaster brake hub does.   the worm gear inside pulls the cone over to meet up with the internal cone race of the hub to make contact and drive the wheel - so spacing the cone by adding washers of diffrent thicknesses to the hub will shorten the amount of freeplay the thing will have between freecoaster set - and foward pedal engagment.

your gona have to take the hub apart - and take the parts to your local hardware store to see if they have a fiew diffrent thickness washers that will work   mostly trial and error type stuff   but for the cost of the trip to the store and about 2$ in washers you might get it running nicely.
also - you are gona need the correct size cone wrenches for that taska hub.    it needs to be ajusted so the bearings are at the sweet spot.   if its too loose its gona run like poo.  same if its too tight.
but if properly maintained - and well greased up  the taska un sealed freecoaster will last a good long service life.       no real need to go out and spend $$$ on some fancy one to end up not liking that one either.

Thanks Brian! Great info! I thought I was going to have to drop some big bills to get a good free coaster.


"Time is a great teacher, unfortunately it kills all it's pupils"
"BMX Mausoleum, where old bikes go to die and have their picture taken" Hector Dangus

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#49 2010-06-22 3:10pm

aswtx75
Museum Newbie
Registered: 2010-01-27
Posts: 18

Re: Advice on Flatland bikes to an oldskool noob?

jimib wrote:

Thanks Brian! Great info! I thought I was going to have to drop some big bills to get a good free coaster.

this might help you also  http://www.wtlw.net/ff/taska/

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#50 2010-06-22 4:22pm

jimib
Museum Addict
From: Asheville, NC
Registered: 2008-06-21
Posts: 1826
Bikes: 16
Website

Re: Advice on Flatland bikes to an oldskool noob?

aswtx75 wrote:

jimib wrote:

Thanks Brian! Great info! I thought I was going to have to drop some big bills to get a good free coaster.

this might help you also  http://www.wtlw.net/ff/taska/

Awesome! Thanks! I am glad I found this thread.


"Time is a great teacher, unfortunately it kills all it's pupils"
"BMX Mausoleum, where old bikes go to die and have their picture taken" Hector Dangus

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