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1977 Quicksilver Type 1a  RSS Feed

#1 2008-08-31 8:17am

QuickieMon
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From: Newcastle, Australia.
Registered: 2008-07-10
Posts: 26
Bikes: 16
Website

1977 Quicksilver Type 1a

http://bmxmuseum.com//image/quick011.jpg http://bmxmuseum.com//image/quick012.jpg http://bmxmuseum.com//image/quick013.jpg http://bmxmuseum.com//image/quickie0177.jpg

1977 Quicksilver Type 1a

The first ever Quicksilver.

Quicksilvers were the first Australian made BMX bike, the first model was just a copy of a Mongoose, but became extremly popular and respected in Aus. This frame here is THE very first frame produced, and you can see in one of the pics it is the bike on the left, this was taken at Australias first BMX track at Ryde-Eastwood in Sydney in 1977. Notice this one has no rear brake bridge.




http://bmxmuseum.com/img/view-bike-in-museum.gif

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#2 2008-08-31 8:30pm

g-flash
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Registered: 2007-04-22
Posts: 656
Bikes: 9

Re: 1977 Quicksilver Type 1a

Very nice!


Free your mind and your ass will follow!

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#3 2008-09-01 5:00am

QuicksilverBMX
Pro Member
From: Perth, WA
Registered: 2006-01-02
Posts: 460
Bikes: 35

Re: 1977 Quicksilver Type 1a

Love it Pete, nice piece of important Aussie bmx history

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#4 2008-09-13 10:41pm

Kid_Carbine
Centurion Member
From: NSW Australia
Registered: 2008-06-09
Posts: 102
Bikes: 2

Re: 1977 Quicksilver Type 1a

Well you can't just show us the picture, tell us that it's the first one, then just sit back.
Tell us more, I need more, more more.

How did you come to know of it?
How are you sure that it's actually the very first frame to be made?
Where was it located? [general area is OK]
What's its life story as you know it?
Is it a pre-production [prototype] frame?
Was there ever a prototype anyway?
Is it a production frame that was sold to the public, or retained for use by the maker?
Where has it been most of its life, in use, in storage, in a museum?
Is that the original paint in your pictures? [If so then it's had VERY little use]
Do you have the rest of it?
Do you know what the original components were ....... exactly?
What is the serial number, or other markings?
What month in 1977 was it made?
Where was it made? [Location + Factory, back shed, other?]

I hate it when someone dangles something like this in front of me. It's teasing at its worse.

Interesting to note in the picture that
The two furthest from the camera have Motomag wheels which doesn't automatically make them Mongoose bikes. [but probably are]
The two middle riders are about to push off with their left feet on the pedal suggesting they are possibly left handed.
No Quicksilver sticker on the downtube? [Did they have one on the other production frames in 1977.
Do you know who the rider of the Quicksilver is?

http://bmxmuseum.com/image/quickie0177_lg.jpg

Last edited by Kid_Carbine (2008-09-13 10:43pm)


I'll keep building bikes till I die, & maybe a couple of days after that. Quicksilver
It's Aussie for "BMX"

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#5 2008-09-28 4:37am

QuickieMon
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From: Newcastle, Australia.
Registered: 2008-07-10
Posts: 26
Bikes: 16
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Re: 1977 Quicksilver Type 1a

Hi Kid Carbine ! Phew, a few questions there to answer !
The frame was owned by a guy called Mark Schliemann, he and his brother raced it for a few years, they later returned it to Competition development and had it freshly powder coated and stickered, then it sat at their place for 25 years until it was sold on ebay. It is definately 'pre-production' as it has no brake bridge and a really bad gusset. It has no serial number.

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#6 2010-01-08 10:36am

micks
Museum Newbie
Registered: 2010-01-08
Posts: 1

Re: 1977 Quicksilver Type 1a

Gentlemen, Lets set the record straight. the QuickSliver pictured was the first built by Steve Meddows, owner of Competition Development in Rydlemere NSW. All later Quickies had the fork gusset facing inward not outward like this one. Why the change, i'm not sure? The bike was bought by my mum Kay for my brother & myself to race. My brother soon got off it and on to a Mongoose and i later jummped onto a JMC as the need for "liteness" & the ability to "jump the gate" became the new game in winning races.
The Quickie was stolen on an adventure down to Eastwood bike shop one saturday morning but was thankfully returned to me after a week of searching the local D's. It had been repainted by the mug who stole it. It was then strippped and re finnished in original colour(candy apple red) & re stickered by Mr.Meddows. The bike then sat in our garage for years.
Until i tripped over this site & saw the post, I thought my brother still had posession of the bike.
I thought it would have been a good starter my son,Max. Thanks for that Mark. I only hope the, now owner understands the history & the herritage the old Quickie & treats it acordingly.
Thanks for the memories, Cheers, Michael.

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#7 2010-06-15 8:21pm

koori8
Museum Newbie
From: Dharug (Sydney) OZ
Registered: 2009-01-22
Posts: 21
Bikes: 7

Re: 1977 Quicksilver Type 1a

Fascinating gentlemen!


I want to be the first to mono on Mars!
(Pretty pleeeeaaaaaase 'Mr Branson'?!)

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#8 2010-07-04 5:58pm

JS-44SDS
Pro MemberProfile Ultimate Pro
From: NJersey
Registered: 2008-01-27
Posts: 11035
Bikes: 4
For Sale: 5

Re: 1977 Quicksilver Type 1a

Man there's a punch in the face.


DON'T be a whining, nit picking, bawling, stalking, sticker nerd.....its not pretty man.

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#9 2010-07-05 4:18am

coasty
Pro Member
From: Queensland, Australia
Registered: 2007-03-25
Posts: 3194
Bikes: 18

Re: 1977 Quicksilver Type 1a

micks wrote:

Gentlemen, Lets set the record straight. the QuickSliver pictured was the first built by Steve Meddows, owner of Competition Development in Rydlemere NSW. All later Quickies had the fork gusset facing inward not outward like this one. Why the change, i'm not sure? The bike was bought by my mum Kay for my brother & myself to race. My brother soon got off it and on to a Mongoose and i later jummped onto a JMC as the need for "liteness" & the ability to "jump the gate" became the new game in winning races.
The Quickie was stolen on an adventure down to Eastwood bike shop one saturday morning but was thankfully returned to me after a week of searching the local D's. It had been repainted by the mug who stole it. It was then strippped and re finnished in original colour(candy apple red) & re stickered by Mr.Meddows. The bike then sat in our garage for years.
Until i tripped over this site & saw the post, I thought my brother still had posession of the bike.
I thought it would have been a good starter my son,Max. Thanks for that Mark. I only hope the, now owner understands the history & the herritage the old Quickie & treats it acordingly.
Thanks for the memories, Cheers, Michael.

Michael, I know it must be a shock to see this frame on here. Owned by someone else you don't know.
I can tell you Pete, the current owner, is the biggest and most clued up Quicksilver collector in the world!
He has all the rare frames by Quicksilver and does all the repro stickers and pads for them as well.
If I knew Pete had my old frame I'd be pretty happy knowing it'll be treasured.
I know this doesn't help your cause much though.


70's bmx is where it's at.

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#10 2010-11-13 8:03pm

jamfer
Banned
Registered: 2010-05-30
Posts: 197

Re: 1977 Quicksilver Type 1a

i guess foot brake only hay .big_smile:

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#11 2011-11-23 1:10am

Kid_Carbine
Centurion Member
From: NSW Australia
Registered: 2008-06-09
Posts: 102
Bikes: 2

Re: 1977 Quicksilver Type 1a

We learn many things over the years as a result of our collecting & research.
From what I have been able to learn over the past few years I think that I can add a little more to this thread.

I believe that this is in fact the very first Quicksilver frame ever made, but it isn't the bike in the picture showing four riders about to start racing. [see this frame in the photo album]

From snippets of information received it would appear that two frames were made at about the same time, neither having a brake bridge.
The only difference that I can see is that the gusset plates were switched side for side on the second frame which leaves the 'lip' turned inward & this is the format that was selected for production.

The bike in the picture previously mentioned has the inward turned lip on the hole in the gusset.

A carefull examination of a photo of the other bike, taken during the same racemeeting, shows that it is essentially a 1977 Mongoose with a Quicksilver frame. This is not at all surprising since Competition Development were importers & distributors of a wide range of US sourced BMX bikes & components at the time, including stuff supplied by BMX Products Inc. so the components were simply drawn from their parts bins.

This is the bike in the race lineup photo. There a great number of similarities in the two frames
Of note is the

Decoster fork
ACS hub [whole Mongoose wheel actually]
Gold stem [I think]
Inward turned hole in the gusset
Ashtabula crank with what looks to me to be a small Three Arrows chainwheel. [Mongoose option]
The lack of a brake bridge.
The lack of a seat post clamp. [They hadn't realised that the tube shrinks where it is welded & didn't have a reamer at the time of manufacture]
The lack of any Quicksilver stickers. [not yet available when the photo was taken]

The rider was Dave Waldren.

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a164/KB10/BMX%20only/56a13f9c.jpg


I'll keep building bikes till I die, & maybe a couple of days after that. Quicksilver
It's Aussie for "BMX"

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#12 2012-04-06 6:28pm

AjayVBMX
Pro Member
Registered: 2008-06-29
Posts: 9

Re: 1977 Quicksilver Type 1a

I think I should possibly weigh into this discussion because I actually took the photo of the four bikes starting and a friend of mine took the photo of the same bike jumping.

Firstly, the bike in these photos was the first quicksilver prototype frame.  It had been welded up within a couple of days of the race meeting and as someone has correctly pointed out, the seat pole is jammed in the frame because the shrinkage of the welding made the hole smaller and they didn't have time to ream it out (which they did on later models).

As far as I know, only one frame was made with no brake bracket and it is likely that the reconditioned frame in the photos above is that frame, because we don't have any photos of the RHS gusset.  I think it's quite possible that the frame has an inwards flared hole on the RHS and an outwards flared gusset on the LHS.  This could be perfectly possible, if they made two gussets the same, i.e. not made as mirror copies.  Maybe the owner of the frame can confirm if the RHS gusset does in fact have a inwards flared hole.

The rider on the bike is Dave Walden and also as far as I know, he owned it initially.  The components used on the bike were stock items from Competition Development, so that means that are mainly BMX Products Inc sourced, i.e. Mongoose.

The other riders in the starting line photo are:

Jeff Keen
Mark Bradley
Brett Ryan

Jeff is on a Suzuki BMX and actually took the photo of the Quicksilver jumping you see here.  He did various stories for Australasian Dirt Bike at the time about BMX and took photos for those stories.  This photo is actually in a book called BMX Down Under as I remember it (but I can't find my copy right now!)

Mark Bradley is of course the person who welded a large proportion of the quicksilver frames during their production.  He was at the time, also a Sponsored Mongoose Rider, as was Brett Ryan.

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#13 2014-09-25 8:14pm

madmick
Museum Newbie
Registered: 2014-09-25
Posts: 1

Re: 1977 Quicksilver Type 1a

I bought one of these brand new from Bob Panter on the gold coast in 1977 and raced for his team at Windsor in Brisbane. I have a pic of it but it's a newspaper clipping in black and white so not really good enough to post. It does have the strip for the rear brake but there was no back brake on it. Did all the QS's come out without the rear brake from this era?

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#14 2016-03-15 7:25am

Kid_Carbine
Centurion Member
From: NSW Australia
Registered: 2008-06-09
Posts: 102
Bikes: 2

Re: 1977 Quicksilver Type 1a

Time passes & we learn more.

The professor is right, there was only one prototype to begin with, som the info I had earlier was incorrect.
The gusset plates were thought to be interchangeable left & right so that the gusset hole would have an inward turned hole both sides.
Oops, they were not interchangeable, so one that turned out to be a 'right side only' gusset was welded to the left side resulting in the odd arangement seen here

Production frames were all made with gusset holes turned inwards on both sides & all were made with a brake bridge.
The earliest currently known production frame carries a date code of 18th of May 1978 & the sequentially applied serial is 24. [185824] [DD-M-Y-NN]
This would sugest that the first few production frames were made in early 1978. The production rate appears to have been very low at first as two frames, frames serialed 65 & 66, are date coded the 12th of October 1978.


I'll keep building bikes till I die, & maybe a couple of days after that. Quicksilver
It's Aussie for "BMX"

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