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1988 Ozone Method One  RSS Feed

#1 2005-06-02 10:26am

Anonymous
Pro MemberThis Is Not An Actual Account
From: Everywhere
Registered: 2012-03-02
Posts: 519
Bikes: 523
Website

1988 Ozone Method One

http://bmxmuseum.com//image/38_1.jpg http://bmxmuseum.com//image/df_1.jpg http://bmxmuseum.com//image/ozone_ad_1988.jpg http://bmxmuseum.com//image/craig_grasso.jpg

1988 Ozone Method One

Short lived company with great bikes

From an email:
I was pretty stoked to learn about your web site and
amazed that you'd reference Ozone Freestyle. I think
Pete Brant gave you some background, but I'd like to
fill in the blanks. The following probably is way too
much information, but is kind of fun to write- bare
with me.
When I started Ozone it was out of a favor to a
family-run business in San Jose, Ca. The family (Hsu)
was importing low-end bicycles from Taiwan and selling
them at the San Jose Flea markets. A couple of other
bike importers had started at the flea market and had
gone on to being reputable manufactures. The Hsu
family wanted to follow this model and began the
process of upgrading their product line and made their
initial step towards marketing a new line of bikes.
I had some marketing and graphic arts background and I
was going out with the owners daughter and they asked
me help out.
I went to a bicycle trade show in Reno to check out
the bike market and saw a freestyle demo by CW and
Hutch. I was totally blown away.
I started hanging out at Golden Gate Park and Beach
Park Bicycles in Foster City on the weekends to check
out the small group of riders that were pretty regular
there. Skyway was just starting to sponsor a lot of
riders in Nor Cal and almost everybody wanted to ride
for them. I chatted with some of the riders and told
them I was interested in designing and building a
fresstyle bike. I asked them what they liked and
didn't like about the bikes they were riding.
I met a rider- John Ficarra who was into the technical
aspect of riding and he had some excellent input.
I was obsessed with the design aspect and came up with
a couple frame designs. I got more feedback. When I
arrived at a design I felt satisfied with, I went to
Taiwan to various factories to try to find a quality
factory that could produce a small quantity of high
quality bikes.
After some real horrific experiences I finally
produced the first Ozone bike. These were fluorescent
pink and orange, and a soft purple.
These models had Skyway wheels and Odyssey rotors.
Decent bikes for a first attempt.
I went to a lot of contests and started to put a team
together. I bought a quarter-pipe trailer thing and
proceeded to get some gigs.
I started advertising in BMXPlus and then moved over
to Freestylin' mag. Spike Jones (director) was 14
years old then working at Freestylin' as a part time
photographer and was being tutored by Wendy Osborne
(RL's sister) who was the main photographer for
Freestylin'. Wendy's dad ran Freestylin' mag. Bob Haro
started his number plate business in the back of the
Osborne's publishing business.
During this time all the major players- Gt, Haro, Dyno
had freestyle teams- Eddie Fiola, Dino DeLuca, et al.
Really solid riders that were all American, white kids
that wore BMX uniforms and helmets to ride ground and
ramp.
Most all riders were jonesing to look like these
sponsored riders but were a little concerned about
going to school in a BMX uniform; if you know what I
mean. Everybody wanted to look like hardcore skaters
but had these BMX icons for their freestyle heroes.
I thot the uniform thing a little misplaced for
freestyle riders and didn't want my team to have the
appearance of the rather constrained corporate teams.
I went to contests and saw some amazing riders that
were considered a little too ethnic or "free spirited"
to be included in the GT-Dyno flock.
I happily picked-up these riders and flowed them bikes
and whatever else I could acquire from our
co-sponsors- Vans, Rector, ACS, etc. I was warned by
some of the more convervative members of the AFA that
my relationship with riders like Dave Vanderspeck,
(committed suicide) Pete Augustin, and Craig Grasso
would put me at odds with the contest freestyle
community. This community resembled the skateboard
contest scene of the late '70's as it promoted its own
agenda over the changing freestyle community. Ozone
had become a haven for the hardcore and
disenfranchised.
I met Nick Philip at an AFA contest and agreed to make
T-shirts. He was going back to England if he couldn't
do Anarchic here in the U.S. as GT and Freestylin'
couldn't continue paying him under the table for the
ads he was doing for them. Anarchic Adjustment was the
only internationally known fashion company that came
from Freestyle roots. We opened stores in Japan and
worked with Jesus Jones, EMF, De-lite and became
famous (15 minutes) fashion designers. Ozone died from
lack of interest.
After hitting the one million dollar a season mark,
Anarchic eventually died from the strain of
continually staking it's future on the bleeding edge
of design.
I've included some pics of an ad I did back in 1988.
Hope I haven't bored you to death. I had a lot of fun
writing this- I haven't thot about these events for
quite awhile. I hope this will be a welcome addition
to the BMX Museum.
Also see ourgarden.com- a site I did quite sometime
ago- has a nice Ozone page. Also the "meet alan" page
is kind of interesting- hit the "next" button.

alan


http://bmxmuseum.com/img/view-bike-in-museum.gif


This is not an actual account, just a place for members to post there bikes without their name being associated to it.
This is not an actual account, just a place for members to post there bikes without their name being associated to it.
This is not an actual account, just a place for members to post there bikes without their name being associated to it.
This is not an actual account, just a place for members to post there bikes without their name being associated to it.
This is not an actual account, just a place for members to post there bikes without their name being associated to it.

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#2 2007-01-12 5:35am

2Fresh
Expert
Registered: 2006-02-10
Posts: 590

Re: 1988 Ozone Method One

I believe these pictures show the very Ozone Method:Air i now own and how it was set up before it ended up to AJK and from there to my possession. AJK sold this bike to me as a frame, fork & bars set in 2004.
From the 2 images i can see for example the very set Ozone bars that came with black ODI Mushrooms. At the time the rest of the parts were for sale at AJK's, like the Mongoose sprocket etc. There is also a mild easily identified bump in the weld seam at the headtube/downtube support plate on the sprocket side of the bike that i believe distinguishes the frame set being the very same i now own. It is very interesting to see how the bike was set up before it ended up to me!
Thanks again AJK for hooking me up with the bike of my dreams! Oh, and correct me if i'm wrong with my "theory", lol.

-Timo

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#3 2007-01-12 3:22pm

raul
Expert
From: NM desert
Registered: 2006-10-27
Posts: 586
Bikes: 4

Re: 1988 Ozone Method One

Yeah, I'd say that's the same f/f Timo. Looks much better now.

I'm pretty sure the Ozone pegs I have are the same ones in those pics as well.

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#4 2007-02-26 5:00pm

maisylego10
Centurion Member
From: Kansas City ,KS
Registered: 2006-12-06
Posts: 143

Re: 1988 Ozone Method One

Your story explains why I saw a picture of Vanderspek riding one of these.


my friends bike kills huffys smile

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#5 2007-03-20 4:44pm

elfdoublecross
Pro Member36-40 Novice "Sarge"
From: Central Wisconsin
Registered: 2006-09-22
Posts: 2044
Bikes: 21
For Sale: 35

Re: 1988 Ozone Method One

got some great info there, thanks for sharing that!


E6 Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, NBC NCO

Check out my For Sale stuff.

Looking for a chrome ELF 1 1/8 threadless  fork in decent condition. Decal color and condition doesn't matter.

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#6 2007-11-27 1:34pm

iwantanoldschoolbike
Expert
From: Norwood, MA
Registered: 2007-09-03
Posts: 677
Bikes: 2

Re: 1988 Ozone Method One

nice bike!


glaoigh mé Iodáileach garsún.

(thats gaelic)

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#7 2008-01-28 4:03pm

Axlepeg
Museum Newbie
Registered: 2008-01-25
Posts: 3

Re: 1988 Ozone Method One

Great little read, there.  Glad I finally read it, being my favorite bike and all.

2Fresh's Ozone just won the popular vote for 2007 Bike of the Year at Vintage.

As proud as I can sometimes be about what-all I accomplished in 1989 on my Ozone, deep down I know it was mostly the bike.

80's BMX enthusiasts are a subset, in-and-among themselves.  Ozone lovers are a cult following all their own...

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#8 2008-01-28 5:57pm

CoolRiderNJ
Pro Member
From: Hazlet, NJ
Registered: 2007-08-07
Posts: 1641
Bikes: 9

Re: 1988 Ozone Method One

thats a great story. nice to here info from a reputable source. the bike is pretty hot too.

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#9 2008-01-28 6:02pm

FRESSTYLE FREEK
Pro Member(fantstik Spellr)
From: Fountain Valley, CA
Registered: 2007-06-28
Posts: 12853
Bikes: 59

Re: 1988 Ozone Method One

very cool nothing rong with OZONE there one of my dream /wish list bikes.never get tired of seeing them.


Kindness is like Manure does You No Good unless You spread It around
bikes were made to be pedalled if we don't ride them they get sad:(!
YES I RIDE A PINK BIKE!! WANT TO MAKE SOME THING OUT OF IT!

2017 heavyweight build off entry submission thread link
http://bmxmuseum.com/forums/viewtopic.p … 0#p5846730
Don't get butt hurt when someone posts their opinion to an open forum.

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#10 2008-06-02 2:53pm

slimmdiggity
Museum Newbie
Registered: 2007-10-14
Posts: 24

Re: 1988 Ozone Method One

Isnt ozone still in buisnes?I swear I saw one at acedemy sports.

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#11 2008-09-12 12:30am

RXREKTD
Pro Member
From: Los Angeles, CA
Registered: 2008-05-02
Posts: 1289
Bikes: 1

Re: 1988 Ozone Method One

Anyone have any pics/specs of these bikes.


Looking for a few parts so please PM me if you have it:

24" Gold Araya/Ukia Speedline Hoops
Single Comp III Yellow Label 24 x 2.125 in black
Single Knarler Knobby 24 x 1.75

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#12 2011-02-26 10:16pm

crujones76
Member
From: St. Louis, MO
Registered: 2011-01-12
Posts: 25

Re: 1988 Ozone Method One

Great bike, nice read


"Cru, remember the lumber yard...go balls out."

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#13 2011-05-18 7:26am

hutchlover
Museum Newbie
From: hutch city
Registered: 2009-11-20
Posts: 20

Re: 1988 Ozone Method One

cool cool

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#14 2012-03-01 6:23pm

Planograman
Pro Member
From: St. Louis, MO
Registered: 2012-02-07
Posts: 87
Bikes: 1

Re: 1988 Ozone Method One

I remember a few riders from our team/group in the late 80's getting free Ozone frame and forks, etc.  St. Louis, MO, south city.  Can't remember how those were acquired, one of the guys must have run into the above guest maybe.

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#15 2012-05-03 1:24am

CnoSleep05
Member
From: Windsor, CT
Registered: 2011-08-06
Posts: 77
Bikes: 8

Re: 1988 Ozone Method One

It saddens me that some of the greatest bikes ever made are basically unatainable because so few were produced.Ozone's from what I've heard(never saw 1 in the flesh)R God's gift2flatland.I was all set2hold u responsible in some way for the company's demise but I can't because by your story I can feel the pride n love you felt in the creation process.Forgive me if I seem jealous n bitter,no 1 loved freestyle more than me,it was my religion but I was deprived of the full experience due2where I lived.Never any shows,parks,or ramps in Louisiana,just riders on what they could afford.By mid 89,I was the last rider left who hadn't given up on the sport,then my Cyclepro Radix/Tracker Rumbler was stolen and the end of the era.U Cali boys never knew how fortunate u were 2 have what u had back then,I'm 37 now n have begun my own collection but I'll never have an ozone cause few remain n those that do r not fool enough 2 part with em.So when u pass by that method 1,touch it for me,and never take it for granted.cool


Rollin since 1981

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#16 2015-12-02 9:06pm

flat43
Member
From: Huntington Beach, CA
Registered: 2014-03-05
Posts: 67
Bikes: 3
Website

Re: 1988 Ozone Method One

Anonymous wrote:

http://bmxmuseum.com//image/38_1.jpg http://bmxmuseum.com//image/df_1.jpg http://bmxmuseum.com//image/ozone_ad_1988.jpg http://bmxmuseum.com//image/craig_grasso.jpg

1988 Ozone Method One

Short lived company with great bikes

From an email:
I was pretty stoked to learn about your web site and
amazed that you'd reference Ozone Freestyle. I think
Pete Brant gave you some background, but I'd like to
fill in the blanks. The following probably is way too
much information, but is kind of fun to write- bare
with me.
When I started Ozone it was out of a favor to a
family-run business in San Jose, Ca. The family (Hsu)
was importing low-end bicycles from Taiwan and selling
them at the San Jose Flea markets. A couple of other
bike importers had started at the flea market and had
gone on to being reputable manufactures. The Hsu
family wanted to follow this model and began the
process of upgrading their product line and made their
initial step towards marketing a new line of bikes.
I had some marketing and graphic arts background and I
was going out with the owners daughter and they asked
me help out.
I went to a bicycle trade show in Reno to check out
the bike market and saw a freestyle demo by CW and
Hutch. I was totally blown away.
I started hanging out at Golden Gate Park and Beach
Park Bicycles in Foster City on the weekends to check
out the small group of riders that were pretty regular
there. Skyway was just starting to sponsor a lot of
riders in Nor Cal and almost everybody wanted to ride
for them. I chatted with some of the riders and told
them I was interested in designing and building a
fresstyle bike. I asked them what they liked and
didn't like about the bikes they were riding.
I met a rider- John Ficarra who was into the technical
aspect of riding and he had some excellent input.
I was obsessed with the design aspect and came up with
a couple frame designs. I got more feedback. When I
arrived at a design I felt satisfied with, I went to
Taiwan to various factories to try to find a quality
factory that could produce a small quantity of high
quality bikes.
After some real horrific experiences I finally
produced the first Ozone bike. These were fluorescent
pink and orange, and a soft purple.
These models had Skyway wheels and Odyssey rotors.
Decent bikes for a first attempt.
I went to a lot of contests and started to put a team
together. I bought a quarter-pipe trailer thing and
proceeded to get some gigs.
I started advertising in BMXPlus and then moved over
to Freestylin' mag. Spike Jones (director) was 14
years old then working at Freestylin' as a part time
photographer and was being tutored by Wendy Osborne
(RL's sister) who was the main photographer for
Freestylin'. Wendy's dad ran Freestylin' mag. Bob Haro
started his number plate business in the back of the
Osborne's publishing business.
During this time all the major players- Gt, Haro, Dyno
had freestyle teams- Eddie Fiola, Dino DeLuca, et al.
Really solid riders that were all American, white kids
that wore BMX uniforms and helmets to ride ground and
ramp.
Most all riders were jonesing to look like these
sponsored riders but were a little concerned about
going to school in a BMX uniform; if you know what I
mean. Everybody wanted to look like hardcore skaters
but had these BMX icons for their freestyle heroes.
I thot the uniform thing a little misplaced for
freestyle riders and didn't want my team to have the
appearance of the rather constrained corporate teams.
I went to contests and saw some amazing riders that
were considered a little too ethnic or "free spirited"
to be included in the GT-Dyno flock.
I happily picked-up these riders and flowed them bikes
and whatever else I could acquire from our
co-sponsors- Vans, Rector, ACS, etc. I was warned by
some of the more convervative members of the AFA that
my relationship with riders like Dave Vanderspeck,
(committed suicide) Pete Augustin, and Craig Grasso
would put me at odds with the contest freestyle
community. This community resembled the skateboard
contest scene of the late '70's as it promoted its own
agenda over the changing freestyle community. Ozone
had become a haven for the hardcore and
disenfranchised.
I met Nick Philip at an AFA contest and agreed to make
T-shirts. He was going back to England if he couldn't
do Anarchic here in the U.S. as GT and Freestylin'
couldn't continue paying him under the table for the
ads he was doing for them. Anarchic Adjustment was the
only internationally known fashion company that came
from Freestyle roots. We opened stores in Japan and
worked with Jesus Jones, EMF, De-lite and became
famous (15 minutes) fashion designers. Ozone died from
lack of interest.
After hitting the one million dollar a season mark,
Anarchic eventually died from the strain of
continually staking it's future on the bleeding edge
of design.
I've included some pics of an ad I did back in 1988.
Hope I haven't bored you to death. I had a lot of fun
writing this- I haven't thot about these events for
quite awhile. I hope this will be a welcome addition
to the BMX Museum.
Also see ourgarden.com- a site I did quite sometime
ago- has a nice Ozone page. Also the "meet alan" page
is kind of interesting- hit the "next" button.

alan


http://bmxmuseum.com/img/view-bike-in-museum.gif

Dang! Nice history on Ozone! I loved that bike!


Gabe Weed
29 years riding. Turned pro in 1993. Show rider since 1996
Cheap Goods BMX owner

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#17 2017-11-11 4:55pm

BIZHOUSE
Pro Member
From: California
Registered: 2013-07-13
Posts: 382
Bikes: 10
For Sale: 56
Website

Re: 1988 Ozone Method One

I'm so stoked to read this! Best bike in 88' double cables to the back brake! Thank you for sharing!

We will not forget
We will not forgive
Expect us
OZONE


Follow @ShawnWhiteBMX  YouTube Channel ShawnWhiteBMX Please Subscribe

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